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Author Topic: Riding without a clutch  (Read 466 times)

Richard230

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Re: Riding without a clutch
« Reply #15 on: October 21, 2017, 08:14:15 PM »

I use the revarc to load into my cargo van. I have a drop hitch mounted 90deg turned sideways so the steps are offset to get the ramp in a better place to clear the door with handlebars. Easy to run it up with careful throttle control, not hard to roll it down, not sure if I use my LHRB for that, maybe, it's there if I need it.

I think there is more to Zero's reluctance to add a left hand brake than just the "homologation" line that they gave me when I suggested it. It creates complexity because it isn't simple to combine lever and pedal (but I did*), and so it would become a build option and buyers wouldn't know what to choose if it was one or the other and it would add cost to have both, especially if hydraulic. It will be interesting to see what Alta does.

* http://electricmotorcycleforum.com/boards/index.php?topic=5328.msg50287#msg50287
I would just as soon lose the pedal.

Sent from my Z982 using Tapatalk

Did someone mention pedals?   ???  https://electricmotorcycles.news/gulas-pi1-pedaling-on-a-motorcycle/
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Richard's motorcycle collection:  2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2011 Royal Enfield Bullet 500 Classic, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2005 Triumph T-100 Bonneville, 2002 Yamaha FZ1 (FZS1000N) and a 1978 Honda Kick 'N Go Senior.

togo

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Re: Riding without a clutch
« Reply #16 on: October 24, 2017, 12:24:39 AM »

> I would just as soon lose the pedal.

That's what I did.  This kit:

https://www.tacticalmindz.com/products/dual-fitting-rear-hand-brake-kit 

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It's like flying, but with more traction.  And none of that Z-axis complexity.

Lost my faith in Zero with my 2011 S, but regained it with my 2014 SR.  Diginow SCv2 changed my SR from a fun ride to primary transport.

2014 Zero SR, accessorized. 2008 Vectrix VX-1 NiMH. 2001 Honda Helix.

clay.leihy

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Re: Riding without a clutch
« Reply #17 on: October 24, 2017, 06:57:10 AM »

> I would just as soon lose the pedal.

That's what I did.  This kit:

https://www.tacticalmindz.com/products/dual-fitting-rear-hand-brake-kit
Did you run it through the ABS or bypass it?

Sent from my Z982 using Tapatalk

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Clay
DoD #2160,6

DonTom

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Re: Riding without a clutch
« Reply #18 on: October 24, 2017, 12:28:42 PM »

I just bought a Zero FXS to replace my Suzuki DR200 (dual sport) which was stolen. The Zero is actually a bit lighter (with one battery) and looks like it's going to be fun - I've only had it one day.

I rode the DR200 off-road occasionally, and took it aboard my sailboat. I plan on the same with the Zero.

I realize there are lots of situations where I use the clutch - not just for changing gear. E.g. I have a ramp to get my bike onto a truck or onto my boat, walking alongside. I use the clutch to hold the back wheel when backing down a ramp with the engine off. Or holding the bike on a 25% grade offroad with both feet on the rocks. Or parking on a 25% grade. The Zero looks like it would just run downhill as soon as I took my hand off the throttle.

How do other EV riders handle this ?

I'm having crazy ideas about retrofitting a left-hand brake lever like a bicycle, or spragging the rear wheel with a rod through the spokes.
Is there some reason why you cannot turn on the key and give just a little throttle as you back down the ramp? I have noticed these Zero bikes can go very, very slow. While I have heard that you should not use throttle to hold the bike on a hill, I doubt the few feet down a ramp would damage the motor.

In a couple of weeks, I plan on taking my DS 6.5 on the back of my RV to southern AZ (near Tombstone) .  But  my RV is now 100 miles away (in Auburn, CA) from here and I have not yet tried to load on the DS and take it down. I will try that next week. But I expected the fact that there is no clutch would make it even easier.

I guess I will find out next week when I drive the RV back here to Reno.

The carrier I use is this ABHD.  I have used it before with my 2002 DR200SE. No straps needed. That's what I like about this above ramp. And you can take the bike down forward or reverse.

BTW, my tongue weight limit on my RV is 350 lbs. When I add the DS weight to the bike carrier, it is exactly 350 LBS!

DS 6.5 weight=317 lbs
ABHD weight  = 25 lbs
racks for saddle bags, trunk, windscreen other small stuff=8 lbs
total=350 lbs.

-Don- Reno, NV
« Last Edit: October 24, 2017, 12:52:51 PM by DonTom »
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Original owner of:
1971 Black BMW R75/5
1984 Red Yamaha Venture
2002 Yellow Suzuki DR200SE
2013 Blue Triumph Trophy SE
2016 Orange/Black Kawasaki Versys 650 LT
2016 Orange Moto Guzzi Stelvio
2017 Orange/Black Zero DS ZF 6.5
2017 Red Zero SR ZF13 w/ Pwr Tank

Doug S

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Re: Riding without a clutch
« Reply #19 on: October 24, 2017, 08:20:02 PM »

Is there some reason why you cannot turn on the key and give just a little throttle as you back down the ramp? I have noticed these Zero bikes can go very, very slow. While I have heard that you should not use throttle to hold the bike on a hill, I doubt the few feet down a ramp would damage the motor.

I once trailered my bike up to the Santa Cruz area from where I live in San Diego county, and I didn't use that technique. I just backed down slowly, feathering the front brake lever. These bikes are so light that backing down is very easy to control. Going up the ramp, I found it very valuable to use the ultra-low-speed capability of the motor. A simple walk up the ramp just tickling the throttle made loading as easy as unloading. Between the light weight and the tractability, this bike is truly a pleasure to load and unload.
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There's no better alarm clock than sunlight on asphalt.

DonTom

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Re: Riding without a clutch
« Reply #20 on: October 24, 2017, 11:56:50 PM »

I once trailered my bike up to the Santa Cruz area from where I live in San Diego county, and I didn't use that technique. I just backed down slowly, feathering the front brake lever. These bikes are so light that backing down is very easy to control. Going up the ramp, I found it very valuable to use the ultra-low-speed capability of the motor. A simple walk up the ramp just tickling the throttle made loading as easy as unloading. Between the light weight and the tractability, this bike is truly a pleasure to load and unload.
Glad to hear it. i will see for myself next week.

What bike was it that you were loading and unloading and how high up the ramp did you have to go from the ground?

My RV hitch is a bit on the high side.

-Don-  Reno, NV
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Original owner of:
1971 Black BMW R75/5
1984 Red Yamaha Venture
2002 Yellow Suzuki DR200SE
2013 Blue Triumph Trophy SE
2016 Orange/Black Kawasaki Versys 650 LT
2016 Orange Moto Guzzi Stelvio
2017 Orange/Black Zero DS ZF 6.5
2017 Red Zero SR ZF13 w/ Pwr Tank

togo

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Re: Riding without a clutch
« Reply #21 on: October 25, 2017, 12:34:30 AM »

> > > I would just as soon lose the pedal.

> > That's what I did.  This kit:
> >
> > https://www.tacticalmindz.com/products/dual-fitting-rear-hand-brake-kit

> Did you run it through the ABS or bypass it?

No ABS on my 2014 SR : - )

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It's like flying, but with more traction.  And none of that Z-axis complexity.

Lost my faith in Zero with my 2011 S, but regained it with my 2014 SR.  Diginow SCv2 changed my SR from a fun ride to primary transport.

2014 Zero SR, accessorized. 2008 Vectrix VX-1 NiMH. 2001 Honda Helix.

Doug S

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Re: Riding without a clutch
« Reply #22 on: October 25, 2017, 02:59:08 AM »

What bike was it that you were loading and unloading and how high up the ramp did you have to go from the ground?

It's a 2014 SR, so pretty much the heaviest Zero. At the time, I had a windshield, rack and trunk on it, though I didn't have the SCv2 yet.

It was a standard U-Haul trailer, dunno the actual lip height. My bro had a pretty good handful with his big Harley wannabe, though. My bike was ridiculously easier to manage.
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There's no better alarm clock than sunlight on asphalt.

togo

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Re: Riding without a clutch
« Reply #23 on: October 25, 2017, 06:08:54 AM »


Electrics have so much better throttle control it's not even funny.

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It's like flying, but with more traction.  And none of that Z-axis complexity.

Lost my faith in Zero with my 2011 S, but regained it with my 2014 SR.  Diginow SCv2 changed my SR from a fun ride to primary transport.

2014 Zero SR, accessorized. 2008 Vectrix VX-1 NiMH. 2001 Honda Helix.

MrDude_1

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Re: Riding without a clutch
« Reply #24 on: November 03, 2017, 08:35:12 PM »


Electrics have so much better throttle control it's not even funny.

They HAVE THE POTENTIAL to have so much better throttle control.
They're not quite there yet. When we start getting custom OEM hardware designed for bikes, it will probably improve.

You never realize what you're missing until you're used to something better. Even through I was daily driving literbikes and vtwin sportbikes, whenever I stepped off my CR500 supermoto and went on another 4stroke bike, no matter how sporty, the throttle felt laggy in comparison. I was used to fast throttle response, but the fastER one still stood out dramatically.
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