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Author Topic: Show Us Your Traveling Clothes  (Read 683 times)

Rugby4life

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Show Us Your Traveling Clothes
« on: July 31, 2017, 03:37:08 AM »

Since adding range by adding battery capacity is limited to 1 brick (a 25% increase) the other way to improve range on the highway is by adding a fairing to improve aerodynamics. Show us your aerodynamic improvements and what's your percentage increase in highway range (at what speed).
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Electric Terry

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Re: Show Us Your Traveling Clothes
« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2017, 07:20:33 AM »

I added a Vetter fairing to my 2012 Zero. Range increased at 70 mph 3 fold.  Went from 15,000 watts used at 70 mph to under 5000 watts to maintain 70 mph.   300 highway miles on one charge.

http://insideevs.com/electric-terry-hershner-rides-300-miles-on-zero-motorcycle-on-one-charge/
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Rugby4life

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Re: Show Us Your Traveling Clothes
« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2017, 08:03:32 AM »

Wow! a 300% range increase at highway speed. That's a much more radical mod than I'm prepared to do but it does show what is possible with a well designed fairing. I would be happy with a 30-40% increase without having to crouch with my chin on the tank like a land speed racer. I do have a BMW R100RS upper fairing laying around from a project some time ago. It not only gets the shoulders out of the wind but also the hands. It does punch a big hole in the wind so I need to find a tail section that will help the air blend back in behind the bike.
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Shadow

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Re: Show Us Your Traveling Clothes
« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2017, 11:38:29 AM »

There's measurable gain from having both a large wind screen and a large top case, which is buy-it and bolt-on easy.

Most people who report gains say approximately 8%-12% range benefit adding a large windscreen, and +/-5% effect from adding a top case depending on size and shape combined with tuning the angle of the windscreen. There's an opposite effect riding into a strong headwind although I wouldn't call it any better or worse efficiency than no accessories at all, though surely more comfortable for the rider.

The top rack could be something like the Givi 47L or 55L. I wouldn't go any smaller than the 47L. Talking to someone who added the 33L (34L?) top case they were estimating that it did not have quite enough surface area for the benefit of aerodynamic profile.
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hubert

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Re: Show Us Your Traveling Clothes
« Reply #4 on: August 02, 2017, 01:06:31 AM »

Most road machines are almost as aerodynamic as a shoe box, both 4-wheelers and 2-wheelers.

Air resistance is an issue even for bicycles. The tremendous improvement which is possible on daily usage (not to talk about special record-only machines which are quite inconvenient to use) can be seen from the performance of the velomobiles. These 3-wheel recumbent cycles with integral fairing make it quite easy to cruise at 40 km/h without electric assist and without being an athlete. Stating from my own experience... when I'm not riding the Zero!
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MrDude_1

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Re: Show Us Your Traveling Clothes
« Reply #5 on: August 02, 2017, 01:23:56 AM »


Im less in the "let's be efficient" boat, and firmly on the other "we need more power" side.
I dont care how much power it uses, as long as it gets me there stress-free at the speed I prefer.
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gyrocyclist

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Re: Show Us Your Traveling Clothes
« Reply #6 on: August 02, 2017, 06:00:26 AM »

Most road machines are almost as aerodynamic as a shoe box, both 4-wheelers and 2-wheelers.

Air resistance is an issue even for bicycles. The tremendous improvement which is possible on daily usage (not to talk about special record-only machines which are quite inconvenient to use) can be seen from the performance of the velomobiles. These 3-wheel recumbent cycles with integral fairing make it quite easy to cruise at 40 km/h without electric assist and without being an athlete. Stating from my own experience... when I'm not riding the Zero!
Air resistance is also an issue for geese ;) Fortunately, geese have had many thousands of years to ... oh, nevermind
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Richard230

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Re: Show Us Your Traveling Clothes
« Reply #7 on: August 02, 2017, 08:29:51 PM »

Speaking of fairings, someone from Australia on the BMW forum that I visit posted these photos of (apparently) homemade  fairings that are being used on their famous Honda 110cc "Postie" motorcycles - I assume in an attempt to get them to go a little faster.  If you can put a fairing on a Honda step-through, you can put one on anything.   ;)
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BrianTRice

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Re: Show Us Your Traveling Clothes
« Reply #8 on: August 03, 2017, 08:33:36 AM »

I'm pretty much onboard with Terry's lesson, even if I'm only going halfway with my fairing work.

I've certainly experienced the effect of faster charging, but the way drag wastes power compared to even the best rate of charging means that a good windscreen and a fairing will just make your electric riding life easier beyond the daily commute.

Anyway, here's my dustbin that nets 25-30% more range at speed. Something easier to mount and more attractive is in the collective works. I'm working on a modest but sturdy tail and am hoping to have something I'm proud to show off soon.

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Rugby4life

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Re: Show Us Your Traveling Clothes
« Reply #9 on: August 03, 2017, 09:09:14 AM »

Thanks Brian,
That's exactly what I'm looking for, what are owners doing and how much has it helped.
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BrianTRice

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Re: Show Us Your Traveling Clothes
« Reply #10 on: August 03, 2017, 11:41:22 AM »

Thanks Brian,
That's exactly what I'm looking for, what are owners doing and how much has it helped.

Before this, I got 15% improvement from a Parabellum windscreen and custom MRA mount.

A good stock windscreen should net 10% improvement without custom work, just tuning.

Wheel covers can net may 5% or so, although a front DS wheel cover is a little risky considering its size and position up front.

There's a long involved rabbit hole of aerodynamics discussion going back four years but really just put a good windscreen on first.
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Richard230

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Re: Show Us Your Traveling Clothes
« Reply #11 on: August 03, 2017, 07:35:18 PM »

As you may know, BMW may be about the only modern motorcycle manufacturer who really put some effort into an attempt to streamline a couple of their mass-produced production models.  The 1977 R100RS fairing was developed in their wind tunnel and is still admired by many people as being one of the nicest and most functional motorcycle fairing around.  Then BMW gave it a try with the 1991 K1, with its streamlined front wheel cover.  That attempt kind of went over like a lead balloon, as least as far as sales went. When it comes to streamlining, it doesn't take much to go from great looks to looking like a turd, in the eyes of the motorcycle consumer (which is one of the most conservative consumers of products around).

BTW Brian, I like what you have done so far with your dustbin project. Unfortunately, it goes way beyond whatever Zero (or any other motorcycle manufacturer) might attempt in the way of a production fairing.
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BrianTRice

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Re: Show Us Your Traveling Clothes
« Reply #12 on: August 04, 2017, 02:37:35 AM »

As you may know, BMW may be about the only modern motorcycle manufacturer who really put some effort into an attempt to streamline a couple of their mass-produced production models.  The 1977 R100RS fairing was developed in their wind tunnel and is still admired by many people as being one of the nicest and most functional motorcycle fairing around.  Then BMW gave it a try with the 1991 K1, with its streamlined front wheel cover.  That attempt kind of went over like a lead balloon, as least as far as sales went. When it comes to streamlining, it doesn't take much to go from great looks to looking like a turd, in the eyes of the motorcycle consumer (which is one of the most conservative consumers of products around).

Too true. This is why an impressive visual design needs to be involved. People need to really like their vehicles and enjoy being seen in/on them. Erasmo here shows off his fairing mount which looks like it rolled off the assembly line that way; it's just unfortunate that this fairing is a vintage special design with likely no chance of being widely available:
http://electricmotorcycleforum.com/boards/index.php?topic=6357.msg55328#msg55328

BTW Brian, I like what you have done so far with your dustbin project. Unfortunately, it goes way beyond whatever Zero (or any other motorcycle manufacturer) might attempt in the way of a production fairing.

Thanks! Well, I think a manufacturer will never be able to field a dustbin without a huge investment and betting a motorcycle company that way would be dangerous. But they can make it easier for us with a more robust frame and maybe sturdy bracket systems to support fairings of our choice, and that's probably a good relationship at least.
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Rugby4life

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Re: Show Us Your Traveling Clothes
« Reply #13 on: August 04, 2017, 06:04:13 AM »

Not to hijack my own thread now that we're starting to get pics of actual faired Zeros, but, how's the Corbin seat working for you Terry?
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BrianTRice

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Re: Show Us Your Traveling Clothes
« Reply #14 on: August 04, 2017, 06:32:29 AM »

Not to hijack my own thread now that we're starting to get pics of actual faired Zeros, but, how's the Corbin seat working for you Terry?

The photo above shows my Corbin seat. It's a great seat, worthy of 400-500 miles per day in the saddle easily.

It does take time to wear in, up to 1000 miles before it's suited to your backside (more if you weigh less, I hear, and I'm ~155lbs and it did take a while to be really exceptionally good).
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