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Author Topic: EPA range estimate cycle graphs  (Read 350 times)

Richard230

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EPA range estimate cycle graphs
« on: April 24, 2017, 08:44:09 PM »

Talk about confusing.  ??? Check out all of these different ways various government agencies use to estimate EV battery ranges.  I wonder which one the EV manufacturers use when advertising their maximum driving range?  If I recall correctly, they don't exactly specify which one they are using in their range claims. At least Zero seems to be more up front with their range claims than just providing only one number as most EV manufacturers seem to do in their advertising:   https://greentransportation.info/ev-charging/range-confidence/chap5-ev-range/epa-estimates.html
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Richard's motorcycle collection:  2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2011 Royal Enfield Bullet 500 Classic, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2005 Triumph T-100 Bonneville, 2002 Yamaha FZ1 (FZS1000N) and a 1978 Honda Kick 'N Go Senior.

Burton

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Re: EPA range estimate cycle graphs
« Reply #1 on: April 24, 2017, 09:14:30 PM »

I believe Zero uses the dynometer methods to get their numbers.

Some smaller EV manufactures don't use these methods but rather goes out and gets "real world" numbers to make their claims on. (At least the other EV manufactures I have talked to do this from what I can tell.) Some will even tell you which roads / route they use at given speeds to get the numbers if you ask.

To me I am more interested in said real world data than some dynometer data ...
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Richard230

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Re: EPA range estimate cycle graphs
« Reply #2 on: May 04, 2017, 03:47:51 AM »

I believe Zero uses the dynometer methods to get their numbers.

Some smaller EV manufactures don't use these methods but rather goes out and gets "real world" numbers to make their claims on. (At least the other EV manufactures I have talked to do this from what I can tell.) Some will even tell you which roads / route they use at given speeds to get the numbers if you ask.

To me I am more interested in said real world data than some dynometer data ...

The nice thing about dyno data (for the manufacturer) is that there is no wind resistance.   ;)
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Richard's motorcycle collection:  2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2011 Royal Enfield Bullet 500 Classic, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2005 Triumph T-100 Bonneville, 2002 Yamaha FZ1 (FZS1000N) and a 1978 Honda Kick 'N Go Senior.
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