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Author Topic: DIY Charging system  (Read 2384 times)

alexanderfoti

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DIY Charging system
« on: June 19, 2016, 03:27:39 AM »

Hi all

I am planning on buying the diginow charger for the Zero SR, but in the meantime am looking for a cheap charging system to use at home (non portable).

Can I run 2 Eltek Flatpack 1800 48v PSU's in series. Output voltage is adjustable to 58V max, thinking of running them to 108 volts or so and keeping the onboard charger plugged in at the same time to to balancing etc past 108 volts to 116volts float voltage.

Connected via the Aux connector. Anybody see any issues with this?
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BrianTRice

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Re: DIY Charging system
« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2016, 04:46:37 AM »

This sounds reasonable to me, but I haven't done it.

Check Burton's Meanwell explanation:
http://electricmotorcycleforum.com/boards/index.php?topic=3987
And here's a similar one: http://blog.evmotoblog.com/2016/06/how-to-build-diy-quick-charger-for-your.html
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2016 Zero DSR, 2013 Zero DS, 2012 Suzuki DL-650 V-Strom Adv

MrDude_1

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Re: DIY Charging system
« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2016, 06:48:46 AM »

Hi all

I am planning on buying the diginow charger for the Zero SR, but in the meantime am looking for a cheap charging system to use at home (non portable).

Can I run 2 Eltek Flatpack 1800 48v PSU's in series. Output voltage is adjustable to 58V max, thinking of running them to 108 volts or so and keeping the onboard charger plugged in at the same time to to balancing etc past 108 volts to 116volts float voltage.

Connected via the Aux connector. Anybody see any issues with this?

no issues.. except you do have to plug in the internal charger first so the contactor closes, before the larger charger will work. I would set the voltage higher to.. they are CC-CV so having them at 115 only makes it faster.
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alexanderfoti

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Re: DIY Charging system
« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2016, 02:30:37 PM »

Excellent, thanks both.

Will aim for 115 volts now that I know that others are doing it succesfully. Lots of stuff to read there too .
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remmie

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Re: DIY Charging system
« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2016, 04:22:16 PM »

Eltek Flatpack Chargers are great.

http://electricmotorcycleforum.com/boards/index.php?topic=5763.msg42627#msg42627

I have 2 sets of 2 flatpacks to give 9 kW (1.3 kW with the onboard charger, 1.8 kW with 1 flatpack S, and 3 times 2 kW with 3 flatpack 2 HE). Almost as fast as the diginow charger but not really waterproof  ::)
Including the tankbag only 8 kg's.

115 Volts is fine. They charge up to 90-95% and then taper down to let the onboard do the balancing.

108 Volts would only get you to about 70% SOC.
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alexanderfoti

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Re: DIY Charging system
« Reply #5 on: June 19, 2016, 04:57:28 PM »

Excellent!

Am Planning on 4 x flatpack 2 HE 2000Watts for static charging at home in between errands.

I have read the thread on endless sphere, it mentions programming them over canbus to a different voltage level, but I believe they don't mention the flatpack 2 HE's though. Is it easy enough to program them in the same way as the other models?

Is the programming as easy as Hex codes through a serial to canbus interface? That bit was a bit lacking on the thread, and I must admit I am not that versed in programming canbus items, so may need a bit of guidance on that one :) Once figured all out, I am happy to do a full how to guide for all.
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remmie

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Re: DIY Charging system
« Reply #6 on: June 19, 2016, 05:29:30 PM »

Yes, the programming for the permanent voltage is really easy and works for both flatpack 2 HE and Flatpack S (2 types i used)

Just 2 commands are needed.

remember to use extended CAN-BUS code (29 bit) !!

first command is an 8 byte command to log into the unit. send it to adress 0x05004805 and the command is formed by the serial number with two 00 bytes added. the serial number should be on the unit. example from my stack : 141471110820 is the serial number. Command is 0x05004805, 14 14 71 11 08 20 00 00
second command is a 5 byte command to address 0x05019C00, the command is 29 15 00 44 16 (all Hex)

Important is that the second command is sent to the power supply within 8 seconds of the first, otherwise the PSU will think it has lost connection. You will have to issue the first command again to 'log in'

Now wait 30 seconds without sending any commands but keep the power supply connected to mains (this is an important step)
after 30 seconds, disconnect the power supply from mains for another 30 seconds.
Restart the power supply and it should default to the output voltage you set in the second byte.

The end voltage is contained in the last two byte of the second command (44 16).
To calculate the output voltage first reverse the 2 numbers (1644) and convert that from HEX to decimal. This will give you 5700. This is the end voltage in centivolts. divide that by 100 and you get 57.00 Volts.

The flatpacks don't go up higher than 57.60 Volts (1680 HEX) anything higher will result in an end voltage of 57.60 Volt.

in short :
send : 0x14, 0x14, 0x71, 0x11, 0x08, 0x20, 0x00, 0x00 to address 0x05004805 (depends on the serial nr of the unit)
send : 0x29, 0x15, 0x00, 0x44, 0x16 to address 0x05019C00 within 8 seconds
wait 30 seconds
unplug power
wait 30 seconds
plug in power.
Default voltage should be 57.0 volts




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alexanderfoti

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Re: DIY Charging system
« Reply #7 on: June 23, 2016, 01:32:36 AM »

Thank you very much!!

I do appreciate you taking the time out to write out all the info for me.
Once I get the powersupplies (and the bike) I will write a how to.
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MrDude_1

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Re: DIY Charging system
« Reply #8 on: June 23, 2016, 01:40:56 AM »

Thank you very much!!

I do appreciate you taking the time out to write out all the info for me.
Once I get the powersupplies (and the bike) I will write a how to.

That would be cool. Getting the tiny Eltek supplies and programming them are on my "todo" project list.
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alexanderfoti

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Re: DIY Charging system
« Reply #9 on: June 26, 2016, 02:19:47 AM »

Thank you very much!!

I do appreciate you taking the time out to write out all the info for me.
Once I get the powersupplies (and the bike) I will write a how to.

That would be cool. Getting the tiny Eltek supplies and programming them are on my "todo" project list.

It seems like a great  "Home fast charger" project.

I picked up the 4 x Eltek Flatpack2 HE 2000W 48V for £300 delivered.

Should give 8000W of charging capacity for not much cash! Just have to figure out how much they will draw from the 240V supply at full load.
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alexanderfoti

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Re: DIY Charging system
« Reply #10 on: June 27, 2016, 09:45:18 PM »

Couple of odd things

Eltek 2000w HE - output 2000 Watt
input @ 240Vac @ full load - 11.6 amps
Input 2700watts (roughly)
Efficiency 95% @ full load

somethings doesn't add up somewhere, that looks like 70 ish% efficiency to me?

Also, what is the max current through the "aux charger" anderson power port? 8000Watts at 115VDC is approx 70 Amps, but at lower voltages the Elteks can supply more (85+). Am I going to blow the fuse for that?
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remmie

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Re: DIY Charging system
« Reply #11 on: June 27, 2016, 10:22:36 PM »

Couple of odd things

Eltek 2000w HE - output 2000 Watt
input @ 240Vac @ full load - 11.6 amps
Input 2700watts (roughly)
Efficiency 95% @ full load

somethings doesn't add up somewhere, that looks like 70 ish% efficiency to me?

Also, what is the max current through the "aux charger" anderson power port? 8000Watts at 115VDC is approx 70 Amps, but at lower voltages the Elteks can supply more (85+). Am I going to blow the fuse for that?

The 11.6 amps is the maximum current at nominal input. Nominal input is specified at 185-275 vac. So the maximum current is when input voltage is lowest, 185 vac. 11.6x185 = 2146 watt which is 93% efficiency.

The fuse on the aux port is 100 amps.
My setup with 1 flatpack s at 1800 watt, 3 flatpack2he at 2000 watt and the onboard charger at 1.3 kw does not blow the fuse. I have seen 93 amps in the zero app.
More info in the thread i linked to a couple of posts above this one.
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alexanderfoti

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Re: DIY Charging system
« Reply #12 on: June 27, 2016, 11:15:04 PM »


The 11.6 amps is the maximum current at nominal input. Nominal input is specified at 185-275 vac. So the maximum current is when input voltage is lowest, 185 vac. 11.6x185 = 2146 watt which is 93% efficiency.

Of course, makes sense now!


The fuse on the aux port is 100 amps.
My setup with 1 flatpack s at 1800 watt, 3 flatpack2he at 2000 watt and the onboard charger at 1.3 kw does not blow the fuse. I have seen 93 amps in the zero app.
More info in the thread i linked to a couple of posts above this one.

So you are at 9100 watts - or 93 amps at 98Volt pack voltage (which will be approach 0% SOC)

I will be at 9300 watts - or 95 amps at 98 Volts pack voltage. Pretty close to the 100 amp limit, but again, only at very low SOC's

Thanks indeed!

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remmie

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Re: DIY Charging system
« Reply #13 on: June 28, 2016, 12:22:18 AM »

Alternatively, just don't connect the onboard charger at low SOC. That would reduce the charge power to 8 kW or 82 amps at 98 volt.
You will have to switch the bike on with the key but at home that won't be a problem
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MrDude_1

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Re: DIY Charging system
« Reply #14 on: June 28, 2016, 12:57:11 AM »

Alternatively, just don't connect the onboard charger at low SOC. That would reduce the charge power to 8 kW or 82 amps at 98 volt.
You will have to switch the bike on with the key but at home that won't be a problem
when you do it this way, isnt there a 1 hour timeout or something like that?
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