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Author Topic: Article in August issue of Motorcyclist  (Read 946 times)

ultrarnr

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Article in August issue of Motorcyclist
« on: June 20, 2015, 01:57:26 PM »

There is an article about Mission Motorcycles on page 26 of the August issue of Motorcyclist. It is written by James Parker who helped design the Mission R. There is an interesting comment about how Mission was trying to update 6 year old technology and used the Zero battery pack as an example. It kind of seems that Mission was trying to bring a 2012 vintage motorcycle to market in 2015 before everything died. In some ways I think Lightening is trying to do the same thing. If you look at the Energica Ego it has far more tech and features compared to the Lightening. But I don't think the Ego is on dealer floors yet so who knows how any of this plays out.
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Richard230

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Re: Article in August issue of Motorcyclist
« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2015, 08:55:39 PM »

Here is my summary of the article: 

Mission: Impossible.  That is the title of an article written by James Parker on page 26 of the August issue of Motorcyclist magazine. Mr. Parker is describing the history of Mission Motorcycles.  He was a contractor for the company (starting in 2009) and was the lead engineer for chassis and powertrain development for the Mission R model. He says that they completed the first prototype in early 2011.

Shortly after successfully entering races at Laguna Seca and the IOM, Mission Motorcycles dropped motorcycle development completely to focus instead on the automotive EV field – which he describes as being incredibly tough and just didn't pan out for them. In 2013 the company returned to motorcycle development and Mr. Parker and his team started design work on an updated version of the Mission R, which was produced in 2014. (I saw a couple of the bikes last year that were being displayed at Alice's Restaurant one Sunday – photos attached.) Unfortunately, early this year the team was told that the project wouldn't go forward.  “Mission: impossible.”

Mr. Parker then spends the rest of the article considering the possibilities of  electric motorcycles racing toe-to-toe with the latest IC racing motorcycles in the MotoGP series. He concludes that it would require 660 pounds of (current technology) batteries to equal the power in the 20 liters of gasoline currently being used by MotoGP IC racers. This amounts to 55 kWh of battery power. To reach the power, range and chassis weight necessary to compete in the world's top racing series, these batteries would need to weight only 90 pounds and that is the limiting factor that needs to be addressed in the future.

Whether or not you agree with his analysis, it is an interesting thought experiment and one worth reading.  The Mission Motorcycles history just added to this interesting article.
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Richard's motorcycle collection:  2014 14.2 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2011 Royal Enfield Bullet 500 Classic, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2005 Triumph T-100 Bonneville, 2002 Yamaha FZ1 (FZS1000N) and a 1978 Honda Kick 'N Go Senior.

Richard230

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Re: Article in August issue of Motorcyclist
« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2015, 04:20:02 AM »

A&R reports that Mission Motorcycles has filed for bankruptcy.  So I guess that is the end of that electric motorcycle development episode.   :(  Too bad.  It looked like it could have been an interesting, if expensive, vehicle: 

http://www.asphaltandrubber.com/news/mission-motorcycles-bankruptcy/
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Richard's motorcycle collection:  2014 14.2 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2011 Royal Enfield Bullet 500 Classic, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2005 Triumph T-100 Bonneville, 2002 Yamaha FZ1 (FZS1000N) and a 1978 Honda Kick 'N Go Senior.
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